Sensors & Printing Session

Sensors & Printing Session

Sensors & Printing Session

 

Chair: Hila Elimelech (Plantish)

 

13:30-13:50

Oded Shoseyov (HUJI)
Keynote Speaker

Title:
3D Printing; from tissues and organs to food and wood

Abstract:
Bringing together the toughness of cellulose nano-fibers from the plant kingdom, the remarkable elasticity and resilience of resilin that enables flees to jump as high as 100 times their height from the insect kingdom combined with Human Recombinant Type I collagen produced in tobacco plants; These are the materials of future 3D Printing. Resilin is a polymeric rubber-like protein secreted by insects to specialized cuticle regions, in areas where high resilience and low stiffness are required. Plant cell walls also present durable composite structures made of cellulose, other polysaccharides, and structural proteins. Plant cell wall composite exhibit extraordinary strength exemplified by their ability to carry the huge mass of some forest trees. Inspired by the remarkable mechanical properties of insect cuticle and plant cell walls we have developed novel composite materials of resilin and Crystalline Nano-Cellulose (resiline-CNC) that display remarkable mechanical properties combining strength and elasticity. As a central element of the extracellular matrix, collagen is intimately involved in tissue development, remodeling, and repair and confers high tensile strength to tissues. Historically, collagen was always extracted from animal and human cadaver sources, which pose risk of human pathogens. A tobacco plant expression platform has been recruited to effectively express human collagen, along with three modifying enzymes, critical to collagen maturation. The plant extracted recombinant human collagen type I forms thermally stable helical structures, fibrillates, and demonstrates bioactivity resembling that of native collagen. Today in greenhouses all over Israel farmers grow transgenic tobacco plants producing human recombinant collagen that is used for the production of medical implants that have already in clinical use. We will demonstrate utility of hrCollagen, Cellulose Nano Crystals and resilin using Additive Manufacturing technologies in tissue and organ printing, food and wood products manufacturing.

 

13:50-14:10

Yossi Rosenwaks (TAU)
Keynote Speaker

Title:
Ultra-Sensitive and Selective Sensing using CMOS Compatible Nanowire Transistors

Abstract:
For the past several decades, there is a growing demand for the development of low-power gas sensing technology for the selective detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), important for monitoring safety, pollution and healthcare. Inspired by the sensitive Si nanowire sensors we have developed the Si Electrostatic-Formed Nanowire (EFN), as a new paradigm that combines a highly sensitive and selective platform for detection of various target molecules with standard VLSI compatible fabrication.  Recently, a Pd modified Si-EFN have demonstrated world record response of ~1x109 % for 0.8% H2 and a sensitivity of 398%/ppm at room temperature. This is most probably due to the EFN ability to control the size, shape and the location of its channel post fabrication, which allows to tune and optimize the EFN sensitivity for different analytes. We expect that this novel paradigm will pave the way to a robust sensing platform for real world applications.

 

14:10-14:25

Vladimir Popov (Technion)
Invited Speaker

Title:
New modalities and facilities by Metal Additive Manufacturing Center

Abstract:
Metal Additive Manufacturing Center (MAMC) works on the development and characterization of new and existing metals and alloys. The research uses Powder Bed Fusion machines for Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Electron Beam Melting (EBM). We will present our current activities in aerospace, medical, and advanced materials applications. For the last application, we have developed a customized system for small amounts of powders. Even mixed powders could be manufactured by this approach performing in-situ alloying. We will present the gas atomizer and first experimental findings in gas atomization powders production for the development of new metal alloys for additive manufacturing and powder metallurgy. Among the newest facilities of the MAMC, the nondestructive testing (NDT) system by VibrantNDT will be shown and explained. The revolutionary Process Compensated Resonance Testing (PCRT) measures resonance frequencies through whole parts, allowing customers to test every part and significantly increase final product quality by detecting process variation and structural defects.

 

14:25-14:40

Nurit Atar (SNRC)
Invited Speaker

Title:
3D Printing of Bismaleimide-Based Dielectric Materials

Abstract:
Additive manufacturing is a novel paradigm which has numerous potential applications in industry and research. 3D printing technologies allow formation of extremely complex geometrical structures with high precision and smooth surface. New engineering polymers with diverse characteristics should be developed to expand 3D printing into new applications. Additive manufacturing is of growing interest in particular to the electronics industry as it offers great potential to rapidly build complex objects of embedded electronics, reduce weight, simplify manufacturing processes, and produce flexible circuits.  Metals are being widely used as conductive materials for 3D printing in various printing techniques such as inkjet, aerosol jet printing, and laser induced forward transfer (LIFT). High performance dielectrics, on the other hand, are currently not commercially available. Therefore, the development of highly insulating polymers, possessing high breakdown voltage and high thermal and chemical stability, attains significant research efforts.  Bismaleimides (BMIs), a class of polyimides, are very attractive polymers for 3D printing due to their excellent thermal, mechanical, and chemical stability, and their superior dielectric properties. This work presents a novel UV-curable BMI-based dielectric ink for hybrid 3D printing. The UV reactivity and ink viscosity are optimized by addition of a mixture of photoinitiators and environmentally friendly diluents. Optimization of the jetting and printing conditions allows for the first ever production of 3D thermosetting BMI objects by 3D printing. Thermal post curing is used to enhance mechanical properties and thermal stability of the printed material. The printed BMI demonstrates high dielectric strength, high chemical and thermal stability, low moisture absorption, and low outgassing in high vacuum environment.  Free-form 3D functional electronic devices were designed and manufactured using a hybrid approach which combines multimaterial printing of metal interconnects within dielectric BMI matrix, including embedded electronic elements. The resulting properties of the printed BMI material open a wide range of potential applications in robotics, electronics, automotive, aerospace, and space technologies.

 

14:40-14:50

Rajashree Konar (BIU)
Contributed Speaker

Title:
Robust Room-Temperature NO2 Sensors from Exfoliated 2D Few-Layered CVD-Grown Bulk Tungsten Di-selenide (2H-WSe2)

Abstract:
Fossil fuel combustion and automotive emissions always result in highly toxic emissions. Some of the most commonly known pollutants are nitrogen dioxide (NO2), hydrogen disulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and acetone, to name a few. Among the various gas sensors, resistance-type gas sensors are the most attractive and practical for use in sensing toxic analytes and explosive gases due to their facile fabrication, ease of operation, low cost, and miniaturization. In this regard, 2D materials (2DMs) and especially transition-metal chalcogenides (TMCs) or transition-metal di-chalcogenides (TMDCs) specify a massive range of unique properties that prove their usefulness in applications toward gas sensing. Semiconducting two-dimensional (2D) TMDCs of the type MX2, where M = Mo, W and X = S, Se, are encouraging materials to be explored in areas of gas-sensing because they are exceptionally sensitive to the ambient conditions. We report a facile and robust room-temperature NO2 sensor fabricated using bi- and multi-layered 2H variant of tungsten di-selenide (2H-WSe2) nanosheets, exhibiting high sensing characteristics. A simple liquid-assisted exfoliation of 2H-WSe2, prepared using ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition, allows smooth integration of these nanosheets on transducers. Three sensor batches are fabricated by modulating the total number of layers (L) obtained from the total number of droplets from a homogeneous 2H-WSe2 dispersion, such as ∼2L, ∼5–6L, and ∼13–17L, respectively. Room temperature (RT) experiments show that these devices are specifically tailored for NO2 detection. 2L WSe2 nanosheets deliver the best rapid response compared to ∼5–6L or ∼13–17L. The response of 2L WSe2 at RT is 250, 328, and 361% to 2, 4, and 6 ppm NO2, respectively. The sensor showed nearly the same response toward low NO2 concentration even after 9 months of testing, confirming its remarkable long-term stability. A selectivity study, performed at three working temperatures (RT, 100, and 150 °C), shows high selectivity at 150 and 100 °C. Full selectivity toward NO2 at RT confirms that 2H-WSe2 nanosheet-based sensors are ideal candidates for NO2 gas detection.

 

15:00-15:20

Roundtable Discussion

3D printing for Defence applications


Moderator: Ehud Galun (MAFAT)
Panelists from Rafael, Elbit and IAI

 
 

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IVS-IPSTA 2021 - 39th Annual Conference
November 17, 2021 | ONLINE

Conference Organizing Team


Gilbert Daniel Nessim (IVS President, BIU) | Ilya Grinberg (BIU) | Haim Barak (BIU)

Tatyana Bendikov (WIS) | Elad Koren (Technion) | Muhammad Bashouti (BGU) 
Noa Lachman-Senesh (TAU) | Igal Kronhaus (Technion)
Sharon Waichman (NRCN, Rotem Industries)